fuckyeahjennellujima:

toraveli:

lilcoffee:

realdwntomars:

l0veeelikethis:

wakeupslaves:

Georgia teen’s autopsy reveals organs were removed: He was stuffed with newspaper

by Yvette Caslin


On January 11, 2013, Kendrick Johnson, 17, was found dead rolled up in a wrestling mat at his high school in Valdosta, Ga. An athlete, Johnson was found dead in an upright athletic mat behind the bleachers in the school’s gym on January 11, 2013.

The first autopsy performed by the Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI) on the teen revealed he died from “positional asphyxia” and his death was ruled an accident. A second autopsy was performed by a private pathologist, Dr. Bill Anderson, at the request of his parents, Kenneth and Jacquelyn Johnson, who believe their beloved son was murdered revealed something more horrible. His organs – brains, heart and lungs – were missing and replaced with balls of crumpled newspaper.

Georgia teen found dead in a wrestling mat

Kenneth and Jacquelyn Johnson

His parents, Kenneth and Jacquelyn Johnson, didn’t take this ruling and walk away. They deem it foul play and are demanding officials at Lowndes High School in Valdosta, Ga. turn over the surveillance video. His father believed his son was murdered and requested the case is reopened. There are photos and video that provide evidence that there is more that happened on this fateful day than school authorities are willing to admit. Not far from the body, there was a pair of red stained shoes and a sweatshirt, that authorities claim was not blood therefore they weren’t bagged and tagged.

Both the Lowndes County Sheriff’s Office and the Georgia Bureau of Investigation (GBI), which conducted the autopsy and ruled that he died from “positional asphyxia”, stand by their findings that the boy died accidentally.

The Johnson family has gained the support of the National Action Network and The United Justice League.

Photos are graphic, proceed to the gallery with caution.

This world tho 😓

I’m still not over this!!!!

fucking hell…

this.. this gets me angry

Don’t forget this. They claim he went into a standing mat to get something and died. Gtfoh. Keep fighting mom and dad.

(via hervacationh0me)

yagazieemezi:

The majority of what I draw is pulled from my personal life be it random thoughts that pop up or actual stuff that happens to me. Although the colors are digital, I still stick to using good ol’ paper and pen for my cartoons. I simple believe that there can never be enough brown girl cartoons. - Yagazie Emezi

Website / Facebook / Twitter / Instagram

Dedicated to the Cultural Preservation of the African Aesthetic

kenobi-wan-obi:

curlysalvadoran:

rasdivine:

Unpacking Blackness in Mexico’s Costa Chica

#El Salvador denies it too

Most countries do too.

(via thinkbluela)

yagazieemezi:

Dear White People 

Red Band Trailer

In select cities October 17/Nationwide October 24

(via thesoftghetto)

jediondo:

thinkmexican:

Little Mystery to Iguala Mass Graves: Mexico’s Drug War Is Killing Children
By Laura Carlsen
Young people are now targeted by the very people sworn to protect them. If this isn’t the ultimate duplicity of abusive law enforcement, what is?
Image: Mexican soldier guards mass grave site in the outskirts of Iguala, Guerrero, where at least 28 burned bodies were discovered on Saturday, which authorities say could belong to 43 students who went missing in late September.
Many countries prohibit deploying their military for domestic law enforcement: it’s a recipe for violent authoritarian abuse.
But the Obama administration’s prohibitionist drug war is funding and encouraging abuse and brutal, corrupt, mass-grave-level murders throughout Mexico and Central America – enough that even drug-war apologists admit that the appalling increase in human-rights abuses are a result of sending the military and police into communities in the name of anti-trafficking.
In just nine years, the drug war waged by the US and Mexico has created a climate of violence that has claimed more than 100,000 lives throughout the country, many young people – including two horrific massacres and a mass disappearance in the last six months connected to law enforcement nominally tasked with battling the spread of drugs.
An ambush on 26 September, begun by uniformed local police and finished off by an armed commando, left six young people dead and 43 students missing, nearly half of whom were last seen in police custody. Others are battling for their lives in local hospitals (where the possibility of a new attack is considered so high that the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights ordered precautionary measures for the wounded and the missing). This week, 28 semi-burned bodies were discovered in a mass grave, which authorities say could be the bodies of the missing students. Politicians allied with cartels are blamed for the atrocity.
The mayor of Iguala, Guerrero, where the attacks took place, has gone into hiding, and the city’s head of security is charged with ordering the ambush. A state judge has charged 22 policemen with the crime and accused them of being hit men for the “Guerreros Unidos” gang.
This latest massacre followed the massacre of 22 young people in Tlatlaya, Mexico State, on 30 June in what was originally said to be a confrontation between the 102nd army battalion and a local gang. But evidence from eyewitnesses and forensics now indicates that the soldiers executed the kids, and eight army personnel are under indictment.
The collusion of government and organized crime is so frequent in Mexico that it forms part of the structure and operations of both in many parts of the country. And the lack of justice for crimes committed by members of this alliance is nothing new. But rarely – if ever – have so-called public servants so openly attacked civilians.
The dead and missing students in the latest massacre come from poor, farming families and attended the Ayotzinapa teacher-training college, which provides rural areas with needed teachers and young people with education and careers. The revolutionary-era schools are rooted in the government’s commitment to education and social equality, and continue to sustain the dreams of poor, often indigenous, young people to forge a better future for themselves, their families and their country. In the wake of economic reforms and the North American Free Trade Agreement (Nafta), though, the federal government has targeted the schools for elimination (and a clash between protesting students and the police in 2011 resulted in the death of two students).
Officials stated that the Guerreros Unidos gang was angry with those students for hurting their local businesses and used corrupt government authorities to teach them a lesson – but state actors also had reason to wipe out a focal point of resistance to unpopular national reforms and a school with a reputation as a protest leader. The earlier massacre seems to be the result of the extrajudicial execution of alleged “delinquents” in an operation resembling social cleansing. A recent report by the UN Special Rapporteur found “an alarmingly high rate” of summary executions of supposed cartel or gang members by Mexican security forces.
A nation that murders dissident or disaffected youth destroys its future.
Mexico’s young people have been targeted by the very people who are supposed to protect them at a moment in national history when their future is at stake. The government’s economic reforms, widely hailed as progress in the United States, puts the nation’s development and resources in the hands of a transnational private sector that does not exactly have a reputation for providing for the poor and disadvantaged.
Meanwhile, militarizing Mexico in the name of narcotics control has worked against the peace and democracy the US claims that it promotes. Not only has the drug war made the already-lucrative drug trade more violent by increasing competition among the cartels, it also has established a network of state-crime alliances that can – and are – being used for political purposes.
The war on drugs has never controlled drug trafficking and has always been about social control. Now it’s Mexico’s youth that are paying the price of that duplicity.
Laura Carlsen is a political writer and analyst and the director of the Americas Program of the Center for International Policy. She has also worked as a consultant for the Just Associates (Jass), the Nobel Women’s Initiative, the Swiss Red Cross and the International Organization of Migrations. She is a dual citizen of Mexico and the United States. Follow her on Twitter at @cipamericas.
This article was originally published at The Guardian

:( :( :(
😭

jediondo:

thinkmexican:

Little Mystery to Iguala Mass Graves: Mexico’s Drug War Is Killing Children

By Laura Carlsen

Young people are now targeted by the very people sworn to protect them. If this isn’t the ultimate duplicity of abusive law enforcement, what is?

Image: Mexican soldier guards mass grave site in the outskirts of Iguala, Guerrero, where at least 28 burned bodies were discovered on Saturday, which authorities say could belong to 43 students who went missing in late September.

Many countries prohibit deploying their military for domestic law enforcement: it’s a recipe for violent authoritarian abuse.

But the Obama administration’s prohibitionist drug war is funding and encouraging abuse and brutal, corrupt, mass-grave-level murders throughout Mexico and Central America – enough that even drug-war apologists admit that the appalling increase in human-rights abuses are a result of sending the military and police into communities in the name of anti-trafficking.

In just nine years, the drug war waged by the US and Mexico has created a climate of violence that has claimed more than 100,000 lives throughout the country, many young people – including two horrific massacres and a mass disappearance in the last six months connected to law enforcement nominally tasked with battling the spread of drugs.

An ambush on 26 September, begun by uniformed local police and finished off by an armed commando, left six young people dead and 43 students missing, nearly half of whom were last seen in police custody. Others are battling for their lives in local hospitals (where the possibility of a new attack is considered so high that the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights ordered precautionary measures for the wounded and the missing). This week, 28 semi-burned bodies were discovered in a mass grave, which authorities say could be the bodies of the missing students. Politicians allied with cartels are blamed for the atrocity.

The mayor of Iguala, Guerrero, where the attacks took place, has gone into hiding, and the city’s head of security is charged with ordering the ambush. A state judge has charged 22 policemen with the crime and accused them of being hit men for the “Guerreros Unidos” gang.

This latest massacre followed the massacre of 22 young people in Tlatlaya, Mexico State, on 30 June in what was originally said to be a confrontation between the 102nd army battalion and a local gang. But evidence from eyewitnesses and forensics now indicates that the soldiers executed the kids, and eight army personnel are under indictment.

The collusion of government and organized crime is so frequent in Mexico that it forms part of the structure and operations of both in many parts of the country. And the lack of justice for crimes committed by members of this alliance is nothing new. But rarely – if ever – have so-called public servants so openly attacked civilians.

The dead and missing students in the latest massacre come from poor, farming families and attended the Ayotzinapa teacher-training college, which provides rural areas with needed teachers and young people with education and careers. The revolutionary-era schools are rooted in the government’s commitment to education and social equality, and continue to sustain the dreams of poor, often indigenous, young people to forge a better future for themselves, their families and their country. In the wake of economic reforms and the North American Free Trade Agreement (Nafta), though, the federal government has targeted the schools for elimination (and a clash between protesting students and the police in 2011 resulted in the death of two students).

Officials stated that the Guerreros Unidos gang was angry with those students for hurting their local businesses and used corrupt government authorities to teach them a lesson – but state actors also had reason to wipe out a focal point of resistance to unpopular national reforms and a school with a reputation as a protest leader. The earlier massacre seems to be the result of the extrajudicial execution of alleged “delinquents” in an operation resembling social cleansing. A recent report by the UN Special Rapporteur found “an alarmingly high rate” of summary executions of supposed cartel or gang members by Mexican security forces.

A nation that murders dissident or disaffected youth destroys its future.

Mexico’s young people have been targeted by the very people who are supposed to protect them at a moment in national history when their future is at stake. The government’s economic reforms, widely hailed as progress in the United States, puts the nation’s development and resources in the hands of a transnational private sector that does not exactly have a reputation for providing for the poor and disadvantaged.

Meanwhile, militarizing Mexico in the name of narcotics control has worked against the peace and democracy the US claims that it promotes. Not only has the drug war made the already-lucrative drug trade more violent by increasing competition among the cartels, it also has established a network of state-crime alliances that can – and are – being used for political purposes.

The war on drugs has never controlled drug trafficking and has always been about social control. Now it’s Mexico’s youth that are paying the price of that duplicity.

Laura Carlsen is a political writer and analyst and the director of the Americas Program of the Center for International Policy. She has also worked as a consultant for the Just Associates (Jass), the Nobel Women’s Initiative, the Swiss Red Cross and the International Organization of Migrations. She is a dual citizen of Mexico and the United States. Follow her on Twitter at @cipamericas.

This article was originally published at The Guardian

:( :( :(

😭

(via fuckyeahmexico)

dynastylnoire:

christel-thoughts:

pixienightmaregoddess:

And these are the men making decisions in women’s health. Fantastic.

which is exactly why 0% (with a margin of error of 0%) of this is surprising. Their decisions make it very clear that they are a bunch of sexist fuckshits.

Ahh yes t “Don’t get to small cause I like them thick” from some dude you have no intentions of ever being to with. To the ” You’re pretty for a fat girl”

(Source: sandandglass, via hiphopandinsubordination)

breathelikefire:

black—lamb:

feministingforchange:

feministcaptainkirk:

Spot the lie. Oh wait, trick question

This is SPOT ON!!!

pretty much

(Source: twitter.com, via whitepeoplesaidwhat)

Infographic: A Visual Compendium of Succulents

afroerotik:

I’m an old school feminist.  I’m not a womanist ( a woman terrified of being called a lesbian so she conforms to patriarchy so as not to be offensive to men).  I’m not a new school feminist whose only role is to defend the hyper-sexuality of a generation that thinks that objectifying yourself is empowering.  I’m old school feminist. I believe in fighting the system of patriarchy, sexism, and misogyny that deems women inferior, second-class, and objects and I will fight to the death for women to be seen as equal, capable, and as valuable to society as any person with a penis. 

afroerotik:

I’m an old school feminist.  I’m not a womanist ( a woman terrified of being called a lesbian so she conforms to patriarchy so as not to be offensive to men).  I’m not a new school feminist whose only role is to defend the hyper-sexuality of a generation that thinks that objectifying yourself is empowering.  I’m old school feminist. I believe in fighting the system of patriarchy, sexism, and misogyny that deems women inferior, second-class, and objects and I will fight to the death for women to be seen as equal, capable, and as valuable to society as any person with a penis. 

polar-bite:

clientsfromhell:

Client: Do you do lemonade?

Me: Do we do… lemonade?

Client: Yes, I was told you do that here.

Me: I’m sorry, this is a graphics and print shop.

Client: I know that. I’m not an idiot. 

Me: I’m sorry, I didn’t mean to -  

Client: Look If you can’t lemonade these papers for me then I’ll go somewhere else!

Me: Do you mean… laminate?

RETAIL

(via to-g-or-not-to-g)